WELCOME TO IB FILM!
I'm your host, David Gran. You might know me from such films as Welcome to SAS and An Expat in China Searching for Bagels. If you have any questions, you can always find me at david (dot) gran (at) saschina (dot) org.

Here is the OFFICIAL IB FILM GUIDE: We will be going over the important parts in Year 2, but feel free to read it at your convenience:



In this class we will be looking at film from three distinct, but interdependent areas of film study:


  • Analysis
  • Film History / Film Theory
  • Film Production


All of your major projects in this class will focus on one of those areas, but include important connections each of the other areas. Projects in year one may include, but are not limited to:


  • Music Video
  • Short Narrative
  • Documentary
  • Director Study
  • Genre Study


In Year Two, we will be focusing on the following assessments. The work in year one will help build the skills that you will need to be successful in understanding, analyzing, and creating your own films.



SL
HL
Textual analysis
Study one extract, of approximately 5 minutes, from a prescribed film and offer a detailed textual analysis of the extract within the context of the film as a whole
Study one extract, of approximately 5 minutes, from a prescribed film and offer a detailed textual analysis of the extract within the context of the film as a whole
Film theory and history
Study of at least two films from more than one country
Study of at least four films from more than one country
Creative process
(Production Portfolio)
Create and produce an original film as part of a team or as an individual
  1. Create and produce an original film as part of a team or as an individual
  2. Create an individual trailer for the film production


SL
HL
External assessment
Independent study
Rationale, script and annotated list of sources for a documentary production of 8–10 pages
Rationale, script and annotated list of sources for a documentary production of 12–15 pages
Presentation
An oral presentation of a detailed textual analysis of an extract from a prescribed film of up to a maximum of 10 minutes
An oral presentation of a detailed textual analysis of an extract from a prescribed film of up to a maximum of 15 minutes
Internal assessment
Film production
One completed film project of 4–5 minutes including titles
One completed film project of 6–7 minutes including titles
An associated trailer of 40–60 seconds
Documentation in relation to the film production
Rationale of no more than 100 words
Written commentary of no more than 1,200 words
Rationale for film of no more than 100 words
Rationale for trailer of no more than 100 words
Written commentary of no more than 1,750 words
External assessment criteria
Independent study
Individual SL markband descriptors
Individual HL markband descriptors
Presentation
Individual SL markband descriptors
Individual HL markband descriptors
Internal assessment criteria
Production portfolio
(Film productions and supporting written documentation)
Five assessment criteria:
A—Planning and research
B—Reflection and evaluation
C—Professional and technical skills
D—Effective use of film language
E—Originality and creativity
Five assessment criteria:
A—Planning and research
B—Reflection and evaluation
C—Professional and technical skills
D—Effective use of film language
E—Originality and creativity

Course Description:

Film is both a powerful communication medium and an art form. The Diploma Programme film course aims
to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts.
Through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making, the Diploma Programme film
course explores film history, theory and socio-economic background. The course develops students’ critical
abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film. To
achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts,
theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures.
The IB film course emphasizes the importance of working individually and as a member of a group.
Students are encouraged to develop the professional and technical skills (including organizational skills)
needed to express themselves creatively in film. A challenge for students following this course is to become
aware of their own perspectives and biases and to learn to respect those of others. This requires
willingness to attempt to understand alternative views, to respect and appreciate cultural diversity, and to
have an open and critical mind. Thus, the IB film course can become a way for the student to celebrate the
international and intercultural dynamic that inspires and sustains a type of contemporary film, while
appreciating specifically local origins that have given rise to cinematic production in many parts of the
world.

Course Objectives and Outcomes

For any student to create, to present and to study film requires courage, passion and curiosity: courage to
create individually and as part of a team, to explore ideas through action and harness the imagination, and
to experiment; passion to communicate and to act communally, and to research and formulate ideas
eloquently; curiosity about self and others and the world around them, about different traditions, techniques
and knowledge, about the past and the future, and about the limitless possibilities of human expression
through film.

At the core of the IB film course lies a concern with clarity of understanding, critical thinking, reflective
analysis, effective involvement and imaginative synthesis that is achieved through practical engagement in
the art and craft of film.


Class Rules:
Be on time and be prepared.
Respect yourselves, others, and your surroundings.
Film class is for film. Not math, not social studies. Film.
Practice Artistic Integrity and Create Your Own Original Work!
Be responsible for yourself and your fellow filmmakers. Everyone is responsible for cleaning their own area, the classroom, AND helping each other in order to leave on time.
Follow all rules in the SAS student handbook.

Make-up Work & Late Work:
  • · Due dates and deadlines for major projects are given in advance. It is up to you to schedule your time appropriately.
  • ·Projects or individual components may be reworked in order to better demonstrate your learning. The request to rework an assignment must be made within 3 days of receiving your assignment or project grade. You will need to complete a re-submittal plan that outlines the learning that you plan to demonstrate, and have it approved by your teacher before the project can be revised. After the form has been turned in, you and your teacher will discuss your learning plan. All reworked/resubmitted pieces are due by the end of the next project.
  • · You have 1 week to make up any work from an excused absence. It is the student’s responsibility to check for missed assignments and to turn in missing work.
  • · In emergencies and serious illnesses, other accommodations between the student and teacher will be arranged.
  • · I am available after school and at lunch time for open studio/extra work time, however it is your responsibility to schedule time in advance.
  • · HOMEWORK: If homework is not completed for the start of the class, you will be given the opportunity to complete it THAT day in the Second Chance Room. You will need to turn it in to me at the beginning of the next class period. Should you choose not to, you will be given additional chances to visit the SCR until it is finished.
· Major Projects: If you do not complete or turn in a major project, the following steps will occur:
o Log Entry: Parents, administrators and counselors are contacted immediately when projects are not turned in.
o Second Chance Room (SCR): you will be given the opportunity to complete your project in the SCR. If the project is not completed at the end of the session, you will automatically be assigned to the SCR until the work is done.
o The project will be marked as Missing in Gradebook. Additionally, your grade will be temporally changed to an Incomplete until a grade is given for the assessment.
o A zero will replace the Missing/Incomplete grade if the work is not submitted by two days before the start of exams.
Grading Policy:
  • · Summative assessments include final projects, quizzes, and presentations which demonstrate your learning.

  • · Formative assessments include homework and mini projects.

  • · Grades will be updated on Powerschool on a regular basis. If there is a grade issue, please see me before or after school to discuss it. Grades will not be discussed during class, as class time is for making art.

  • · Powerschool automatically rounds up grades, therefore grades will not be changed unless there is a human error.

Grading Categories:
· Summative Assessments: 80%
  • · Final Assessment: 20%
  • · Formative Assessments will be entered into the gradebook, but will not be counted in your final grade.

Academic Dishonesty/Artistic Integrity
This Art class should stretch your artistic abilities and your imagination. The course expects that you create original and personal work which is not copied from other sources. You are expected to practice artistic integrity at all times!
Any work that makes use of other artists’ work (including music) and/or published images must be used appropriately and credited in your films. It is unethical, constitutes plagiarism, and often violates copyright law simply to copy or use an image (even in another medium) or sound that was made by someone else.

Artistic Integrity also includes taking responsibility and not allowing someone else to physically do your work for you. Turning in someone else’s work with your name on it is cheating. The school cheating policy will be strictly enforced, and you will need to create an entirely new project within a designated amount of time.

In film, this means that you are responsible for your job on the team. For example, the cinematographer may assist the editor, but not do the editor's job for them, or vice versa. You will be graded only on your job requirements, not the overall film.

Should you commit a form of academic dishonesty the following steps will be followed:
  1. A Log entry for ALL levels of academic dishonesty will be made
  2. You will be given an alternative assignment and assessment. This assignment is exempt from the resubmittal policy stated above.
  3. Consequences will be administrated by Mrs. Doleman, Ms. McKenna or Dr. Heckmann

Learner Profile
Active Learner: Active learning is contributing to class discussions, group brainstorming sessions and critiques. Time and effort goes into the planning and design of projects, as well as pushing the boundaries and going beyond the minimum requirements.
Integrity: In addition to following the SAS Academic Honesty guidelines in the Student Handbook, a student demonstrating integrity is focused and on task at all times- no Skype, games, texting, etc.
Responsibility: Responsibility includes meeting deadlines, being prepared for class, and cleaning up.